FACULTY OF FINE ARTS AND DESIGN

Department of Architecture

ARCH 340 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Theoretical Bases of Architectural Representation
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
ARCH 340
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course -
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To improve students' understanding of architectural representation
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Student will be able to develop a consciousness on the differences of architectural representations.
  • Student will be able to develop a design using theoretical knowledge.
  • Student will be able to develop academic reading skills in English.
  • Student will be able to do architectural criticism through architectural representations.
  • Student will be able to develop learning skills through diverse methods such as reading, presenting, discussing, designing and filmmaking.
Course Description Architects make use of different media to represent their work. Representations – drawing, model, photograph, film, computer graphics, etc. – are tools to communicate their ideas with others. The medium that mediates the idea has an impact on the progress of the design, which brings forth the necessity of a through understanding of media.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction postscript: Slessor, C. (2013). Editorial View: Architectural Representation. The Architectural Review (http://www.architectural-review.com/view/editorial-view-architectural-representation/8647155.article)
2 Preliminaries: Representation: Why is it important required: Olsberg, N. (2013). The Evolving Role of the Drawing. The Architectural Review (http://www.architectural-review.com/essays/the-evolving-role-of-the-drawing/8646928.article) optional: Tufte, E.R. (1997). Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative. Graphic Press: Connecticut. (pages 28-31)
3 Origins of Architectural Representation I required: Smith, K.S. (2005). Architect’s Drawings. Oxford: Architectural Press. (p.6-9). optional: Ousterhout, R. G. (1999). Master builders of Byzantium. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.(Chapter 3, 58-85)
4 Origins of Architectural Representation II required: Smith, K.S. (2005). Architect’s Drawings. Oxford: Architectural Press. (p.19-21,27) optional: Ackerman, J.S. (1997). Villard de Honnecourt's Drawings of Reims Cathedral: A Study in Architectural Representation. Artibus et Historiae, Vol. 18, No. 35. (1997), pp. 41-49.
5 Sketches required: Smith, K.S. (2005). Architect’s Drawings. Oxford: Architectural Press. (p.19-21,27) optional: Ackerman, J.S. (1997). Villard de Honnecourt's Drawings of Reims Cathedral: A Study in Architectural Representation. Artibus et Historiae, Vol. 18, No. 35. (1997), pp. 41-49. required: Smith, K.S. (2005). Architect’s Drawings. Oxford: Architectural Press. (p.2-5) optional: Cross, N. (2007). Designerly Ways of Knowing. Berlin: Verlag (p.54-58, The role of sketching in design)
6 Conceptual Diagrams: Case Studies required: Do, E.Y. & Gross, M. D. (2001). Thinking with diagrams in architectural design. Netherland: Kluwer Academic. (1-8) optional: Dogan, F., & Nersessian, N. J. (2003). Collaboration in design: Evolving conceptual diagrams. In Alterman, R. & Kirsh, D. (Eds.), 2003 Cognitive Science Society Conference, Boston, MA. July 3-August 02: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
7 Rethinking Scale I: Architectural Models required: Smith, A.C. (2004) Architectural Model as Machine. Oxford: Architectural Press. (Introduction) optional: Yaneva, A. (2009). Made by the office for metropolitan architecture: An ethnography of design. Rotterdam: 010 Publishers. (p. 45-48, 78-85)
8 Midterm
9 Rethinking Scale II: Representation in Urban Design required: Shane, D.G. (2010). Urban diagrams and urban modeling. In "Diagrams of Architecture: AD Reader", edited by Mark Garcia. Chichester: Wiley AD Reader. optional: Allen, L., Smout, M. (2008). The Retreating Village. London: The Bartlett School of Architecture
10 Re-presentation/ representation required: Cook, P. (2008) Drawing: The Motive Force of Architecture, Chichester: John Wiley and Sons. (p.64-73, drawing as statement) optional: Cook, P. (2008) Drawing: The Motive Force of Architecture, Chichester: John Wiley and Sons. (p.92-110, drawing as composition)
11 Photographs to support design ideation To be announced
12 Representing Utopias To be announced
13 Representation as a critical practice To be announced
14 Rethinking Scale III: Mock-ups required: Bell, K. (2007). Mock-ups: Giving hospital clients the ultimate reality check. Healthcare Design.(http://www.healthcaredesignmagazine. com/article/mock-ups-giving-hospital-clients-ultimate-reality-check) optional: Pietroforte, R., Tombesi, P., & Lebiedz, D. D. (2012). Are physical mock-ups still necessary to complement visual models for the realization of design intents? Journal of Architectural Engineering, 18(1), 34-41.
15 Student presentations
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials Abrahams, T. (2013). Computers in Theory and Practice. The Architectural Review (http://www.architectural-review.com/essays/computers-in-theory-and-practice/8646960.article) Ackerman, J.S. (1997). Villard de Honnecourt's Drawings of Reims Cathedral: A Study in Architectural Representation. Artibus et Historiae, Vol. 18, No. 35. (1997), pp. 41-49. Bafna, S. (2008) How architectural drawings work - and what that implies for the role of representation in architecture, The Journal of Architecture, 13:5, 535-564. (available at http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/13602360802453327) Cross, N. (2007). Designerly Ways of Knowing. Berlin: Verlag (p.54-58, The role of sketching in design) Dogan, F., & Nersessian, N. J. (2012). Conceptual diagrams in creative architectural practice: the case of Daniel Libeskind's Jewish Museum. Arq: Architectural Research Quarterly, 16(1), 15-27. Evans, R. (1989). Architectural projection. In Architecture and its image. E. Blau and E. Kaufman (eds). Montreal: Canadian Centre for Architecture. Henderson, K. (1999). On line and on paper: Visual representations, visual culture, and computer graphics in design engineering. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. Kellet, R. (1990). Le Corbusier's Design for the Carpenter Center: A documentary analysis of design media in architecture, Design Studies, 11(2),164--180. Olsberg, N. (2013). The Evolving Role of the Drawing. The Architectural Review (http://www.architectural-review.com/essays/the-evolving-role-of-the-drawing/8646928.article) Ousterhout, R. G. (1999). Master builders of Byzantium. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.(Chapter 3, 58-85) Pietroforte, R., Tombesi, P., & Lebiedz, D. D. (2012). Are physical mock-ups still necessary to complement visual models for the realization of design intents? Journal of Architectural Engineering, 18(1), 34-41. Slessor, C. (2013). Editorial View: Architectural Representation. The Architectural Review (http://www.architectural-review.com/view/editorial-view-architectural-representation/8647155.article) Tufte, E.R. (1997). Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative. Graphic Press: Connecticut. (pages 28-31) Yaneva, A. (2009). Made by the office for metropolitan architecture: An ethnography of design. Rotterdam: 010 Publishers. (p. 45-48, 78-85)

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
16
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
4
30
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
25
Final Exam
1
25
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
23
75
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
25
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: '.16.' x total hours)
16
0
Study Hours Out of Class
15
2
30
Field Work
0
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
0
Portfolio
0
Homework / Assignments
4
4
16
Presentation / Jury
1
3
3
Project
1
5
5
Seminar / Workshop
0
Oral Exam
0
Midterms
1
3
3
Final Exam
1
5
5
    Total
110

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to offer a professional level of architectural services.

X
2

To be able to take on responsibility as an individual and as a team member to solve complex problems in the practice of design and construction.

X
3

To be able to understand methods to collaborate and coordinate with other disciplines in providing project delivery services.

 

X
4

To be able to understand, interpret, and evaluate methods, concepts, and theories in architecture emerging from both research and practice.

X
5

To be able to develop environmentally and socially responsible architectural strategies at multiple scales. 

X
6

To be able to develop a critical understanding of historical traditions, global culture and diversity in the production of the built environment.

X
7

To be able to apply theoretical and technical knowledge in construction materials, products, components, and assemblies based on their performance within building systems.

X
8

To be able to present architectural ideas and proposals in visual, written, and oral form through using contemporary computer-based information and communication technologies and media.

X
9

To be able to demonstrate a critical evaluation of acquired knowledge and skills to diagnose individual educational needs and direct self-education skills for developing solutions to architectural problems and design execution.

X
10

To be able to take the initiative for continuous knowledge update and education as well as demonstrate a lifelong learning approach in the field of Architecture.

X
11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Architecture and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 


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