FACULTY OF FINE ARTS AND DESIGN

Department of Architecture

ARCH 403 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Contemporary Architectural Discourse
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
ARCH 403
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course -
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives By focusing on selected basic texts that address the interdisciplinary nature of architectural discourse and thinking, the aim of the course is to inculcate students' critical thinking abilities in architecture.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Will be able to discuss the basic elements of contemporary architectural discourse at an international level
  • Will be able to explore contemporary architectural texts
  • Will be able to develop architectural interpretations in the light of the theoretical texts covered in the course
  • Will be able to express architectural thoughts in verbal and in written form
  • Will be able to compare and contrast the emerging debates in contemporary architectural discourse
Course Description Course is comprised of lectures and discussions based on chosen texts on postmodernism, semiotics and phenomenology, critical regionalism, green architecture, globalization, technology and space

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction of course topics
2 Theory and Practice in Contemporary Architecture: Contradiction or Compromise? Quiz 1
3 From modernism to postmodernism Quiz 2 Jencks, C. (2011) The Story of Post-Modernism: Five Decades of the Ironic, Iconic and Critical in Architecture 1st Edition p. 19-47
4 Semiotics and phenomenology Quiz 3 Read, S. (2003) Technicity and Publicness: Steps towards an Urban Space FOOTPRINT Architecture and Phenomenology, Autumn 2008, pp. 7-15
5 Critical regionalism Quiz 4 Frampton, K., 2002. Towards a Critical Regionalism: Six Points for an Architecture of Resistance. In: The Anti-Aesthetic: Essays on Postmodern Culture, Foster, H. (Ed.), New Press, New York, ISBN-10: 1565847423, pp: 16-29.
6 Project on Contemporary Architects: Each student will examine the works of a contemporary architect in terms of its theoretical foundations and ideas and submit a report. In class, the students will present their work and have a discussion. Homework Submission/ Presentation
7 Sustainable architecture Quiz 5 Owen, C. & K. Dovey (2008) ‘Fields of sustainable architecture’, Th e Journal of Architecture 13(1): 9-21.
8 Biomimicry and Biophilic Design Quiz 6 Rao, R. (2014) “Biomimicry in Architecture” International Journal of Advanced Research in Civil,Structural,Environmental and Infrastructure Engineering and Developing Volume: 1 Issue: 3 08-Apr-2014,ISSN_NO: 2320-723X
9 Building taller and wiser? Quiz 7 Martin Parker (2015) Vertical capitalism: Skyscrapers and organization, Culture and Organization, 21:3, 217-234, DOI: 10.1080/14759551.2013.845566
10 Project on Building Tall: Creating Vertical Sustainability in the City, students will research sustainable skyscraper design and choose one such building project to review and critique . Students will submit a report. In class, students will present their work and have a discussion. Homework Submission/ Presentation
11 Impact of globalization on architectural discourse Quiz 8 Castillo-Villar, F. R. (2016). Urban icons and city branding development. Journal of Place Management and Development, 9(3), 255-268. doi:doi:10.1108/JPMD-03-2016-0013
12 Urban Age and its Architecture Quiz 9 Boano, C., y Vergara Perucich, F. (2016). Half-happy architecture. Viceversa, (4), 58-81.
13 Art and the City Quiz 10 Miles, M. (2013) ‘Art and Culture: The Global Turn’, pp. 19–38 in Grierson and Sharp (eds) Re-Imagining the City. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press
14 Project on mega-events shaping the contemporary architectural discourse: Each student will examine a particular mega-event and how it has advanced/shaped/reflected on the contemporary architectural discourse. Students will submit a three-four page report. In class, students will present their work and have a discussion. Homework Submission/ Presentation
15 Debate on the future trends in the contemporary architectural discourse
16 Review of the Semester

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

C. Greg Crysler, Stephen Cairns and Hilde Heynen, eds. The SAGE Handbook of Architectural Theory (Sage Publications 2012).

Terry Eagleton, Literary Theory (Minneapolis: The University of Minnesota Press, 2003).

Charles Jencks, The Iconic Building (New York, Rizzoli International, 2005).

Paul L. Knox, Cities and Design (New York: Routledge, 2011).

Ariane Lourie Harrison, Architectural Theories of the Environment (New York: Routledge, 2013).

Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa and Aaaron Sprecher (eds) Architecture in Formation: On the Nature of Information in Digital Architecture (London: Routledge, 2013).

Harry Francis Mallgrave and Christiana Contandriopoulos, eds. Architectural Theory: An Anthology from 1871-2005, Volume II (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing 2008).

Malcolm McCullough. Digital Ground (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005).

John Reader, Cities: A Magisterial Exploration of the Nature and Impact of the City from Its Beginnings to the Mega-Conurbations of Today (New York: Atlantic Monthly Press 2004).

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
5
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
50
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
3
15
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
6
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: '.16.' x total hours)
16
0
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
32
Field Work
0
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
10
10
Portfolio
0
Homework / Assignments
0
Presentation / Jury
3
2
6
Project
1
24
24
Seminar / Workshop
0
Oral Exam
0
Midterms
0
Final Exam
0
    Total
120

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to offer a professional level of architectural services.

2

To be able to take on responsibility as an individual and as a team member to solve complex problems in the practice of design and construction.

3

To be able to understand methods to collaborate and coordinate with other disciplines in providing project delivery services.

 

X
4

To be able to understand, interpret, and evaluate methods, concepts, and theories in architecture emerging from both research and practice.

X
5

To be able to develop environmentally and socially responsible architectural strategies at multiple scales. 

X
6

To be able to develop a critical understanding of historical traditions, global culture and diversity in the production of the built environment.

X
7

To be able to apply theoretical and technical knowledge in construction materials, products, components, and assemblies based on their performance within building systems.

8

To be able to present architectural ideas and proposals in visual, written, and oral form through using contemporary computer-based information and communication technologies and media.

X
9

To be able to demonstrate a critical evaluation of acquired knowledge and skills to diagnose individual educational needs and direct self-education skills for developing solutions to architectural problems and design execution.

X
10

To be able to take the initiative for continuous knowledge update and education as well as demonstrate a lifelong learning approach in the field of Architecture.

X
11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Architecture and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 


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